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Final Public Meeting for Little Cypress Bayou RUAA

Little Cypress Bayou watershed public meeting set for March 29, 2016 in Orange

ORANGE, TEXAS – The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and the Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research invite residents in the Little Cypress Bayou watershed to a public meeting to discuss results from both rounds of recreational use attainability analysis (RUAA) field surveys conducted in the watershed. The meeting will be held in the main offices of the Sabine River Authority located at 12777 Highway 87 N in Orange, TX 77630. Sign-in will begin at 5:45pm and the meeting will start at 6:00pm.

The Little Cypress Bayou is located in Orange County. The waterbody extends from the confluence with the Sabine River to West Bluff in Orange County. The Little Cypress Bayou is on the state’s list of impaired waters for having bacteria levels that exceed water quality standards for primary contact recreation.


At this meeting, landowners and citizens will be updated on the findings from the RUAA and discuss the path forward. The draft technical report entitled “Recreational Use Attainability Analysis for Little Cypress Bayou (0501B) in the Sabine River Basin” will be open for a 30 day public comment period immediately following the meeting. Leah Taylor, with TIAER, “Stakeholder input on the draft technical report is essential to ensure current and historical uses of the Little Cypress Bayou is adequately represented”.

This project is funded by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board through a state nonpoint source grant to the Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research.

For more information about the meeting, visit the project website at http://tiaer.tarleton.edu/ruaa/little-cypress-bayou.html or contact Leah Taylor at 254-968-0513 or at ltaylor@tiaer.tarleton.edu.

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board administers Texas’ soil and water conservation law and delivers coordinated natural resource conservation programs through the State’s 216 soil and water conservation districts. The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is the lead agency for planning, implementing, and managing programs for preventing and abating agricultural and silvicultural nonpoint sources of water pollution. The agency also administers a water supply enhancement program through the targeted control of water-depleting brush; works to ensure the State’s network of 2,000 flood control dams are protecting lives and property by providing operation, maintenance, and structural repair grants to local government sponsors; and facilitates the Texas Invasive Species Coordinating Committee.

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board grants permission for the use of this information as a free service to the news media. Articles may be used either in their entirety or in part, provided that attribution remains. You may print the story or post it on the Internet.